Vancouver Velocity Cars

Storefront of Vancouver Velocity Cars

The weather could not have been worse for my visit to Velocity Cars in Burnaby BC but I had a great time anyways visiting the JDM powerhouse in the suburbs of Vancouver. Japanese Domestic Market or JDM cars are imported to Canada after they are 15 years old. This means that every few years an entirely new generation of vehicles is available to Canadians. These cars are often Right Hand Drive as Japan is another country like England where you drive on the right, however many of the German cars there like BMW, Mercedes Benz, and Porsche are still Left Hand Drive, LHD. These cars offer a unique automotive experience for people looking to have something a little different than the everyday. Check with your local insurance company as some can be particular about the Right Hand Driving experience. Photography with the snow and rain was tricky so it was a only a short visit.

2001 Subaru Impreza WRX STI Bug eye in Vancouver Velocity Cars Burnaby

Canada didn’t get the Subaru Impreza WRX until 2002, and the STI until 2004, so we never enjoyed the Bug Eye variant of the legendary world rally car.

2001 Nissan Skyline R34 Coupe Green
2001 Nissan Skyline R34 at Vancouver Velocity Cars

R34 Nissan Skylines are now available as early examples are 15 years old and this one was a beautiful dark green colour.

1998 Toyota Chaser Tourer V 1JZ VVTi Turbo at Vancouver Velocity Cars
BMW Z3 Roadster with M Package Blue Interior
1998 Honda CR-V at Vancouver Velocity Cars

Here you see the Right Hand Drive Honda CRV which is often used for Rural postal mail delivery.

Nissan Stagea in Vancouver at Velocity Cars

I found this Nissan Stagea curious because it’s the USDM Infiniti G35 but in a Wagon format with a smaller 2.5 liter V6 engine. It’s only recently passed the 15 year mark allowing it to be imported, meaning I’d never seen one in Canada until today.

1998 Alfa Romeo GTV in vancouver at Velocity Cars
Mitsubishi Space Gear at Velocity Cars
Storefront of Vancouver Velocity Cars
Vancouver Velocity Cars

Save-a-Deal Meetings

The purpose of a save-a-deal meeting is to bring business back onto the table that would otherwise be lost by silos in the business. Some businesses do this daily, others weekly, some even monthly depending on their sales cycle. There is always more business that slips through the cracks when sales and business development professionals are working in their silos. Where a deal would be seen as unprofitable to the Sales department, it might have a knock-on or compounding effect to another department. The coordinating team can adjust their ratios to allow the sales department to make a deal that would otherwise not come together, benefiting both businesses. This is especially important to teams where the business units represent such a stark contrast in their dynamics, especially an Us vs. Them division with sales and support.

 

 

Review Pending sales that are unpaid and undelivered. Don’t let a signed deal fall apart.

Review Last Period Traffic and Sales Opportunities with a mind to flatten the barriers that are holding back any deal.

Take notes, codify/classify any recurring themes to elevate to upper management and Product Planning teams. Maybe there is unmet consumer demand.

Personal Development

I’ve just started down a road of systematic personal development, rather than a haphazard approach in the first third of my life. Here is who I’m reading lately.

Personal Development

Jim Rohn

Tony Robbins

Jocko Willink

 

Value Investing

Howard Marks

Warren Buffet

Joel Greenblatt

Ray Dalio

Ben Graham

 

Financial Independence

MrMoneyMustache

 

Cryptocurrency

Andreas Antonopoulos

Laura Shin

Trace Mayer

Tone Vays

 

Blockchain and Consensus Algorithms

Leemon Baird

 

Titanium Canada


Some of you know about my foray into E-commerce. While we netted 4 figure growth in year 2 the growth projections showed we wouldn’t sustain it and reach scale without a significant reinvestment. The initial inventory we bought was our competitive advantage on products with a long lead time and we could notice trends of other sellers going out of stock and then an increase in orders. For the Titanium gifts we sold, it was a seasonal business, meaning December was approximately 30% of the annual sales and the first time we had 4 digit sales numbers for the store.